Adventure EV

ICE

Weight Loss!!!

by on Nov.16, 2009, under Design, EV Land Rover, ICE

Spent the last few days removing the last few bits of ICE related equipment from the Rover.  It’s almost all gone!  Let’s see how the weight loss tallies up…

Engine Radiator and Cooling Fan – 25 lbs

Side Fuel Tank (1/3 full) – 70 lbs

Rear Fuel Tank (2/3 full) – 105 lbs

Exhaust system – 20 lbs

Engine w/ancillaries but without clutch and flywheel/flywheel housing – 470 lbs

Total ICE weight loss = 690 lbs
Just short of my 700 lb goal.  But there’s some still left to go…  Fuel pump, fuel tubing, dual fuel tank solenoid switch, heater hoses to the rear…  And I never counted the weight of the anti-freeze and oil that came out of the ICE and cooling system.

If you recall, I was at 3116 pounds (or thereabouts)… with a little cheating, I think I’ve got the Rover down to 2400lbs pre-conversion weight.  Fantastic!  My Mini still only weighs, 1550 pounds with its ICE, though…

Before I mount the motor, I’ll try and four corner weigh the Rover again… if I have the patience…

Here’s a neat comparison:

EV vs ICE Comparison

192v 11" Kostov DC Traction Motor Land Rover 2.25L Petrol ICE
185 lbs 450lbs
165+ peak HP 72 peak HP
200+ lb/ft Torque 124 lb/ft Torque
11" x 11" x 17" (w/h/d) 25" x 18" x 26" (w/h/d)

The EV motor is significantly smaller, lighter, simpler, more powerful, and virtually maintenance free compared to the ICE.

EV vs ICE

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ICE… Out!

by on Nov.11, 2009, under EV Land Rover, ICE, Tear Down

Today was a good day.  It took awhile but the Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) is out!  Probably don’t really need a video for this…

The job ended up taking more time than expected.  Maybe I should expect that.  The biggest stumbling block had to do with something I did over ten years ago, when I originally rebuilt the Rover.  I used silicon gasket goo between the engine and transmission.  I was young and inexperienced.  It sounded like a good idea at the time… keep liquids from getting into the clutch bell-housing.

But the older, more experienced me, knows the error of my ways.  The silicon gasket goo basically welded the two units together.  I had the engine crane in place, all the bolts out… nothing.  No separation.  I couldn’t even get a razor blade between the two pieces.

Luckily I thought of using two 800 lb racheting tie-down straps to forcefully pull the engine away from the still-mounted-to-the-frame transmission.  It worked!  Happy days!

Don’t seal the transmission to the engine with gasket goo.  It’s not a good idea…

ICE Out!

ICE Out!

Removal of the ICE also revealed some other good news.  The motor adapter from Can EV seems to fit both my Kostov motor and the Land Rover’s clutch housing.  Very good news.  Tomorrow I must go downtown to pick up some mounting hardware… then it’s in with the new.

But let’s just recap some of the installation differences between the ICE and the EV motor.  I had to disconnect a lot of things to get that motor out; fuel line, throttle cable, temperature gauge wire, ground wire, alternator wiring, starter motor wire, oil pressure gauge wire, oil pressure switch wire, distributor wire, coil wire, exhaust downpipe, fan thermostat wiring, upper cooling hose, lower cooling hose, heater output hose, intake manifold heater hose.  And I left most of the ancillaries on the ICE.  That’s a lot of stuff!  It gets worse with more modern vehicles.

As far as I can tell, when I install the EV traction motor, I have to hook up… a positive cable, a negative cable, a thermistor (temperature) wire,  and that’s it.  The thermistor is optional…

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Front dismantled

by on Nov.09, 2009, under EV Land Rover, ICE, Tear Down

One of the great things about old Land Rovers is that they were meant to be mended in the field with a simple toolkit;  a couple of screwdrivers, a couple of wrenches.  It means that I can dismantle it pretty quickly.

It’s time to undergo Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) removal… and all the items that relate to it.  That includes things like the fuel tanks, radiator, exhaust system, and dual heater system.  Removing the front clip and wings gives me great access to the engine bay.  And, it only took about an hour and a half.  Witness…

Now if I could move like that all the time, I’d be done with this whole conversion by tomorrow. As it stands, I just hope to have all the ICE stuff out of the vehicle by the end of tomorrow.
I was able to weigh my first cast-off, the radiator and fan… 25lbs, empty.

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